Home / Religious Freedom

Religious Freedom

Indiana Governor Mike Pence signs the Religious Freedom Restoration Act

When Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, Apple CEO Tim Cook, who is openly homosexual, scolded him on morality; threats to leave the state poured in from Indiana-based businesses Ely Lily, NASCAR, General Electric and Salesforce. Not to be outdone, the NCAA threatened to pull its lucrative college basketball tournaments from the state. Sensing a mutiny over the issue, Pence was forced to insert new language into the law, essentially gutting its protections for religious freedom and turning it into an LGBT rights law. From the IndyStar.com after signing: The nation's latest legislative battle over ...
Read More

Obama Defunds 2 Young Marine Chapters: One Mentions “God” in Oath, the Other Permits Voluntary Prayer

The Obama Department of Justice defunds a Young Marines chapter in Louisiana because their oath mentioned God, and another youth program because it permits a voluntary student-led prayer. A Louisiana lawman is livid over the federal government’s decision to cut off funds for two programs to help troubled young people -- all, he says, because he refused to sign a pledge to bar prayer or any mention of God at their meetings. Julian Whittington, the sheriff of Bossier Parish, Louisiana, told Fox News that the Department of Justice Office of Civil Rights de-funded $30,000 for their Young Marines chapter ...
Read More

MSNBC: Children Don’t Belong to Families… They Belong to the Community.

Melissa Harris-Perry, an MSNBC host and Tulane University professor, said in an MSNBC network promotion spot that, “We haven’t had a very collective notion of, these are our children. We have to break through our private idea that children belong to their parents, or children belong to their families, and recognize that children belong to whole communities. Once it’s everybody’s responsibility and not just the household’s, we start making better investments.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjczwQOnMqg What parent hasn’t wondered at some point, “Are those really my kids?” Now comes a combination of state, federal and international organizations to tell fathers and mothers ...
Read More

ObamaCare Guidelines Finalized Forcing Religious Organizations to Cover Abortion, etc.

In February 2012, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) finalized guidelines requiring employers to pay for coverage of contraception, sterilization, and abortion-inducing drugs and granted a narrow exemption for certain religious employers. Many employers believe that complying with this mandate would violate the tenets of their faith, but failure to adhere to the law could result in steep fines—in the case of one company, an estimated $1.3 million per day. Under Obamacare, employers are required to pay for coverage of contraception, sterilization, and abortion-inducing drugs. While this mandate exempts formal houses of worship and their integrated ...
Read More

The FUNVAX Vaccine Docs Leaked: A Vaccine to be Dispersed Unknowingly on Individuals to Alter Beliefs and Behavior

A quarterly review document is leaked by government scientists for the FUNVAX vaccine for "Religious Fundamentalist" designed to infect brain cells and alter beliefs and behavior and fully intended to be dispersed unknowingly on civilian populations via air, water supply, highway vehicles and insects. The Pentagon report states that tests have been conducted on six different methods of dispersing the virus: "high altitude release", "water supply release", "insect transmission", "diffusion by a ground level object such as a car", "diffusion from a stationary object such as a bottle", and "infection of food supply such as cattle or produce.” You ...
Read More

Lee v. Weisman: Supreme Court Ruled 5-4 that Prayers During School Graduation Violate the Establishment Clause

In the case of Lee vs. Weisman, The Supreme Court ruled that for an adult to mention the word God at a public graduation constituted both psychological and religious coercion against his students. Yet, consider the actions of William Samuel Johnson, a signer of the Constitution and one of America’s leading educators who served as the first president of Columbia College. At his graduation exercises William Samuel Johnson declared to the students, “You, this day, have received a public education. The purpose whereof had been to qualify you better to serve your Creator and your country. Your first great duties, ...
Read More

Ezra Taft Benson, Secretary of Agriculture and future President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Gives a Speech on the Proper Role of Government

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyDrC5q6S9o Men in the public spotlight constantly are asked to express an opinion on a myriad of government proposals and projects. “What do you think of TVA?” “What is your opinion of Medicare?” How do you feel about Urban Renewal?” The list is endless. All too often, answers to these questions seem to be based, not upon any solid principle, but upon the popularity of the specific government program in question. Seldom are men willing to oppose a popular program if they, themselves, wish to be popular – especially if they seek public office. Government Should Be Based Upon ...
Read More

Abington Township School District v. Schempp “Bible Reading in School” Ruled Unconstitutional by Supreme Court

The Pennsylvania school system complied with a state law requiring that ten verses of scripture be read every day. The readings were without interpretation, comment or questions asked, and any student could request to be excused. It was voluntary without coercion, and the Schempp girl never asked to be excused and even volunteered to read the Bible on occasions. (This point was not brought up when the case was before the Supreme Court.)  Yet the parents brought the case to court on grounds that it was coercion.   This case came to the Supreme Court at the same time as the ...
Read More

Engel v. Vitale: Supreme Court Rules School Prayer Unconstitutional

The New York school system had adopted a prayer to be said before the start of each day's classes. This prayer was to help promote good moral character of the students, spiritual training and help combat juvenile delinquency. The regents wrote a prayer for the schools which had to be non-sectarian or denominational. It was so bland that it became known to some religious leaders as the "to whom it may concern prayer." Here is the Regents prayer. Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence upon thee, and we beg Thy blessings upon us, our parents, our teachers and our ...
Read More

Communist Defector Bella Dodd, a CPUSA Leader, Publishes ‘School of Darkness’ & Claims that The New World Order is Communism

Bella Dodd, a former leader inthe Communist Party of America (CPUSA) in the 1930's and 40's who defected, wrote "School of Darkness", which reveals that Communism was a hoax perpetrated by Jewish Illuminati financiers "to control the common man" and to advance world tyranny. Dodd describes Communism as "a strange secret cult" whose goal is the destruction of Western (i.e. Christian) Civilization. Millions of naive idealists ("innocents") are tricked by its talk of helping the poor, but it cares only for power. Bella Dodd was born Maria Asunta Isabella Visono in Italy about 1904. A brilliant and dedicated woman, she ...
Read More

Everson v. Board of Education: Landmark SCOTUS Decision Applying the Establishment Clause in the Bill of Rights to State Law Effecting the Separation of Church and State

Everson v. Board of Education, was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court which applied the Establishment Clause in the country's Bill of Rights to State law effecting a separation of Church and State. The Founders intended the First Amendment words, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion" to guard against the state giving preferential treatment to one religious establishment over another so everyone could worship as they pleased, however they wanted it understood that religion and  morality were "necessary for good government and the happiness of mankind" as pointed out in the 1787 Northwest Ordinance. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black, a life-long member ...
Read More

The US Supreme Court Ruled in Pierce v. Society of Sisters that States could not Compel Children to Attend Public Schools. “The Child is Not the Mere Creature of the State”

Pierce v. Society of Sisters, the U.S. Supreme Court declared unconstitutional a 1922 Oregon law that compelled children aged eight to sixteen to attend not just a school, but the public schools. The Oregon compulsory public education law was sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan, Federated Patriotic Societies, the Masons, and smaller groups that appealed to white supremacist, anti-Catholic, anti-Semitic, and nativist beliefs. Drawing on popular anxieties, the reformers argued that private schools allowed un-American elements to persist, and that compelling attendance to public schools was the only way to assimilate these diverse masses to white American Protestant culture ...
Read More

Videl v. Girard: US Supreme Court Rules that American Schools are to Teach Morals and Christianity Using the Bible in Schools

In 1844 in Philadelphia, a school took an unprecedented position: it would teach its students morality, but not Christianity. The Court ruled it could not do so--the Bible and Christianity must be included: "Why may not the Bible, and especially the New Testament ... be read and taught as a divine revelation in the [schools]--its general precepts expounded. . . and its glorious principles of morality inculcated? Where can the purest principles of morality be learned so clearly or so perfectly as from the New Testament?" Vidal v. Girard' s Executors, 1844 This was the third case cited in ...
Read More

Thomas Jefferson sends his ‘Wall of Separation’ Danbury Letter: Did He Intend to Separate Church and State?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIFe3EqBFO4 Thomas Jefferson sent his 'wall of separation' letter to the Danbury Baptist Association to assure them that although the state offered them religious freedoms only “as favors granted, and not as inalienable rights,” that at least the national Congress could never make a law respecting an establishment of religion.  The First Amendment, then, erected “a wall of separation between church and state.” In 1947 the Supreme Court does just what the First Amendment set out to prohibit, federal control over religious matters of the people. Thomas Jefferson assured them that they need not fear; that the free exercise ...
Read More

John Adams Issues a Proclamation for a National Day of Humiliation, Fasting, and Prayer for the Protection & Blessings of the Almighty God for the new Nation

A national day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer was issued by President John Adams declaring May 9, 1798 the day of fasting for the nation. The proclamation reads below: A PROCLAMATION AS the safety and prosperity of nations ultimately and essentially depend on the protection and blessing of Almighty God; and the national acknowledgment of this truth is not only an indispensable duty which the people owe to Him, but a duty whose natural influence is favorable to the promotion of that morality and piety, without which social happiness cannot exist, nor the blessings of a free government be ...
Read More

St. Thomas African Episcopal Church is Officially Accepted as the First Black Episcopal Parish in the United States by Former Slave, Absalom Jones

In 1762 at the tender age of sixteen, a slave named Absalom Jones witnessed his mother and six siblings sold away while he was brought by his owner to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from Sussex, Delaware. He was put to work in a shop as a clerk and handyman, but was allowed to work in the evenings and keep the earnings for himself. Understanding the value of an education, Absalom acquired a reading and writing primer and a spelling book. With a courage and determination that would be characteristic throughout his life, he taught himself to read. The truth of God’s ...
Read More

President Washington Laid the Cornerstone for the U.S. Capitol Building which was First Used as a Church

Capitol Building Houses a Church Before Congress Before the United States Capitol was used by the Senate or House of Representatives, it was used as a church—or perhaps more accurately as churches. In his plans for America’s new capital, Peter L’Enfant chose Jenkins Hill as the site for the Capitol building, and on September 18, 1793, President Washington laid the cornerstone for the new Capitol. In June 1795—less than two years after the beginning of construction—a church began to meet at the emerging Capitol building. The Federal Orrery, a Boston newspaper, carried the story in its July 2, 1795 edition: ...
Read More

The Bill of Rights was Created to Protect the Civil Liberties of American Citizens and Prevent the Government from Abusing Power

The first 10 amendments to the Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. Written by James Madison in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties, the Bill of Rights lists specific prohibitions on governmental power. The Virginia Declaration of Rights, written by George Mason, strongly influenced Madison. One of the many points of contention between Federalists and Anti-Federalists was the Constitution’s lack of a bill of rights that would place specific limits on government power. Federalists argued that the Constitution did not need a bill of rights, because the people and the states kept any powers not given ...
Read More

Dr. Benjamin Rush: “(Satan) never invented a more effectual means of extirpating Christianity… than by persuading mankind that it was improper to read the Bible at schools.”

Dr. Benjamin Rush to Jeremy Belknap, July 13, 1789: “The great enemy of the salvation of man, in my opinion, never invented a more effectual means of extirpating Christianity from the world than by persuading mankind that it was improper to read the Bible at schools.” Dr. Benjamin Rush wrote in “Essays, Literary, Moral, and Philosophical,” 1798: “I know there is an objection among many people to teaching children doctrines of any kind, because they are liable to be controverted. But let us not be wiser than our Maker. If moral precepts alone could have reformed mankind, the mission ...
Read More

The French Revolution Begins with the Storming of the Bastille: An Illuminati Fomented Revolt to Destroy Morality, Christianity and Liberty in France

The popular image of Bastille Day, indeed of the French Revolution itself, is that the liberty-loving French folk in Paris spontaneously rose up against a tyrannical king and his haughty wife, and heroically stormed the symbol of the Old Regime — the prison fortress known as the Bastille — liberating hundreds of political prisoners. This led to an abolition of the monarchy and the establishment of a government dedicated to liberty for all the people of France. Nothing could be further from the truth. The French Revolution was actually the fruit of decades of radical agitation stirred up by ...
Read More

The Northwest Ordinance is Passed by Continental Congress

In 1781, Virginia began by ceding its extensive land claims to Congress, a move that made other states more comfortable in doing the same. In 1784, Thomas Jefferson first proposed a method of incorporating these western territories into the United States. His plan effectively turned the territories into colonies of the existing states. Ten new northwestern territories would select the constitution of an existing state and then wait until its population reached 20,000 to join the confederation as a full member. Congress, however, feared that the new states—10 in the Northwest as well as Kentucky, Tennessee and Vermont—would quickly ...
Read More

The Constitutional Convention Begins in Philadelphia on May 25th and Ends on Sept 17th with the Miracle of the Constitution

The Constitutional Convention takes place in Philadelphia and, by the account of many participants during the process, ends with a miracle of divine providence in the formation of the constitution that provided the American people with a people's government assuring their rights and freedom, with a balance of powers, and equal representation for all states. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-bmAqhMrX4 "Miracle at Philadelphia " is in fact a quote from a letter written by George Washington. James Madison also used it in writing to friends. In 1787 there is much tension and dissension between the States which started soon after the war of ...
Read More

Jefferson Passed the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom ending the State-Established Church in Virginia and Placing All Religions on Equal Footing

Religious Freedom Day is celebrated in America each year on January 16 — the date of the 1786 passage of Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom. That measure ended the state-established church in Virginia and for the first time placed all denominations on the same legal footing. That act fully protected the right of religious conscience — one of the first rights protected in America. As John Quincy Adams affirmed, “The transcendent and overruling principle of the first settlers of New England was conscience.” When America became an independent nation, the first state constitutions similarly protected the rights ...
Read More

General William Livingston Made a Resolution of Congress that May 17th Should be Observed by All Colonies as a Day of Humiliation, Fast, and Prayer

General William Livingston made a resolution to Congress which passed without dissent: “We earnestly recommend that Friday, the 17th day of May be observed by the colonies as a day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer, that we may with united hearts confess and bewail our manifold sins and transgressions … and by a sincere repentance … appease God’s righteous displeasure, and through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ obtain His pardon and forgiveness.” In times of impending calamity and distress; when the liberties of America are imminently endangered by the secret machinations and open assaults of an insidious ...
Read More

The First Prayer of Congress on September 7, 1774

The first session of the Continental Congress opened the beginning of September in the year 1774 with prayer in Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia. Threatened by the most powerful monarch in the world, Britain’s King George III, America’s founding fathers heard Rev. Jacob Duché begin by reading Psalm 35, the Anglican Book of Common Prayer’s “Psalter” for that day Sept. 7, 1774: “Plead my cause, Oh, Lord, with them that strive with me, fight against them that fight against me. Take hold of buckler and shield, and rise up for my help. Draw also the spear and the battle-axe to meet ...
Read More
Loading...