Home / Founding Fathers

Founding Fathers

Chester Pierce Speech at the Assoc. for Childhood Education Int’l: “Every Child Entering School at the Age of Five is Insane Because He Comes to School with Certain Allegiances…”

April 1972 – In his keynote address to the Association for Childhood Education International, Chester M. Pierce, Professor of Education and Psychiatry in the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard University, proclaims: “Every child in America entering school at the age of five is insane because he comes to school with certain allegiances toward our founding fathers, toward his parents, toward a belief in a supernatural being. It's up to you, teachers, to make all of these sick children well by creating the international child of the future.” ...
Read More

Abington Township School District v. Schempp “Bible Reading in School” Ruled Unconstitutional by Supreme Court

The Pennsylvania school system complied with a state law requiring that ten verses of scripture be read every day. The readings were without interpretation, comment or questions asked, and any student could request to be excused. It was voluntary without coercion, and the Schempp girl never asked to be excused and even volunteered to read the Bible on occasions. (This point was not brought up when the case was before the Supreme Court.)  Yet the parents brought the case to court on grounds that it was coercion.   This case came to the Supreme Court at the same time as the ...
Read More

Congress Begins Reviewing a Document Entitled ‘Communist Goals for Taking Over America’

The House of Representative and later the Senate began reviewing a document entitled "Communist Goals for Taking Over America." It contained an agenda of 45 separate issues that, in hindsight was quite shocking back then and equally shocking today. Here, in part, are some key points listed in that document. 1. U.S. acceptance of coexistence as the only alternative to atomic war. 2. U.S. willingness to capitulate in preference to engaging in atomic war. 3. Develop the illusion that total disarmament [by] the US would be a demonstration of moral strength. 4. Permit free trade between all nations regardless ...
Read More

Communist Defector Bella Dodd, a CPUSA Leader, Publishes ‘School of Darkness’ & Claims that The New World Order is Communism

Bella Dodd, a former leader inthe Communist Party of America (CPUSA) in the 1930's and 40's who defected, wrote "School of Darkness", which reveals that Communism was a hoax perpetrated by Jewish Illuminati financiers "to control the common man" and to advance world tyranny. Dodd describes Communism as "a strange secret cult" whose goal is the destruction of Western (i.e. Christian) Civilization. Millions of naive idealists ("innocents") are tricked by its talk of helping the poor, but it cares only for power. Bella Dodd was born Maria Asunta Isabella Visono in Italy about 1904. A brilliant and dedicated woman, she ...
Read More

The Monument of the Forefathers (The Matrix of Liberty) was Dedicated

Designed by Hammat Billings, the monument honors the Pilgrims Christian values and principles as a matrix of liberty with the necessary components to a free society, and a blueprint of how a free nation can be maintained. From the original concept in 1820 to the laying of the cornerstone in 1859 to its dedication in 1889, it was nearly three-quarters of a century in the making, and contains in simple imagery the great wisdom of the founding era. The components of this significant yet unknown monument teach us how we can preserve America as a shining city upon a ...
Read More

Thomas Jefferson & John Adams Die on the 50th Anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence, Fulfilling Dr. Benjamin Rush’s Prophesy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUPEHQGE2xg The Dream of Dr. Benjamin Rush & God’s Hand in Reconciling John Adams and Thomas Jefferson One of the more bitter aspects of the retirement of John Adams from the presidency in 1800 was the fact that several of those with whom he had early co-labored during the Revolution had become his fervent adversaries. This was especially true in the case of Thomas Jefferson who, although serving closely with Adams during the Revolution, had become one of his chief enemies during President Washington’s administration. This feud not only deeply embittered Adams emotionally but it also troubled Dr. Rush, ...
Read More

Thomas Jefferson sends his ‘Wall of Separation’ Danbury Letter: Did He Intend to Separate Church and State?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIFe3EqBFO4 Thomas Jefferson sent his 'wall of separation' letter to the Danbury Baptist Association to assure them that although the state offered them religious freedoms only “as favors granted, and not as inalienable rights,” that at least the national Congress could never make a law respecting an establishment of religion.  The First Amendment, then, erected “a wall of separation between church and state.” In 1947 the Supreme Court does just what the First Amendment set out to prohibit, federal control over religious matters of the people. Thomas Jefferson assured them that they need not fear; that the free exercise ...
Read More

George Washington’s Farewell Address

George Washington's Farewell Address is a letter written by the first American President, George Washington, to "The People of the United States of America". Washington wrote the letter near the end of his second term as President, before his retirement to his home Mount Vernon. Originally published in Daved Claypole's American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796, under the title "The Address of General Washington To The People of The United States on his declining of the Presidency of the United States," the letter was almost immediately reprinted in newspapers across the country and later in a pamphlet form. The work was later named a "Farewell Address," as ...
Read More

President Washington Laid the Cornerstone for the U.S. Capitol Building which was First Used as a Church

Capitol Building Houses a Church Before Congress Before the United States Capitol was used by the Senate or House of Representatives, it was used as a church—or perhaps more accurately as churches. In his plans for America’s new capital, Peter L’Enfant chose Jenkins Hill as the site for the Capitol building, and on September 18, 1793, President Washington laid the cornerstone for the new Capitol. In June 1795—less than two years after the beginning of construction—a church began to meet at the emerging Capitol building. The Federal Orrery, a Boston newspaper, carried the story in its July 2, 1795 edition: ...
Read More

Dr. Benjamin Rush: “(Satan) never invented a more effectual means of extirpating Christianity… than by persuading mankind that it was improper to read the Bible at schools.”

Dr. Benjamin Rush to Jeremy Belknap, July 13, 1789: “The great enemy of the salvation of man, in my opinion, never invented a more effectual means of extirpating Christianity from the world than by persuading mankind that it was improper to read the Bible at schools.” Dr. Benjamin Rush wrote in “Essays, Literary, Moral, and Philosophical,” 1798: “I know there is an objection among many people to teaching children doctrines of any kind, because they are liable to be controverted. But let us not be wiser than our Maker. If moral precepts alone could have reformed mankind, the mission ...
Read More

General George Washington Elected as the First President of the United States

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QnGjGgbmmw General George Washington elected as the first President of the United States; first Congress under new Constitution. Jefferson returns to U.S. to become first Secretary of State; Hamilton becomes first Secretary of the Treasury. There were no political parties at the time of the first political election - there were only federalists (for ratification of the constitution) and anti-federalists (against ratification of the constitution). Over 90 percent voted federalist, or to ratifiy the constitution. George Washington became the first and only president to be unanimously elected by the Electoral College. He repeated this notable feat on the same ...
Read More

The Constitution of the United States was Ratified when New Hampshire Became the 9th State to Ratify the Constitution, as Specified in Article 7 of the Constitution

It was 11 years after the Declaration of Independence—and four years after American victory in the Revolutionary War—when a small group of delegates convened in Philadelphia to create a new charter for governing the young nation. The result was the longest lasting, most successful, most enviable, and most imitated constitution man has ever known. The United States Constitution has secured an unprecedented degree of human freedom, upholding the rule of law, securing the blessings of liberty, and providing the framework for the people of America to build a great, prosperous, and just nation unlike any other in the world ...
Read More

James Madison: “There are More Instances of the Abridgment of Freedom… by Gradual & Silent Encroachments of Those in Power than by Violent and Sudden Usurpations.”

James Madison (1751-1836) helped frame the Bill of Rights, member of the Continental Congress and rapporteur at the Constitutional Convention in 1776 and 4th President of the United States: In an address to the Virginia Convention he said: I believe there are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations." A major new biography of the fourth president of the United States by New York Times bestselling author Lynne Cheney Lin-Manuel Miranda's play "Hamilton" has reignited interest in the founding fathers; it features ...
Read More

Signing of the Constitution

In a warm room in Philadelphia, 39 men signed the document that formed our nation. With each passing year, America continues her record of having the longest on-going constitutional republic in history. The Constitution. In its seven Articles of some 4500 words, the original Constitution is the “supreme Law of the Land,” distributing powers to three branches of government and the states, and denying others. By beginning “We the People,” the Preamble makes the Constitution the creation of the American people, not the States. Article I (Congress): All of the legislative powers “herein granted” by the new Constitution to Congress are ...
Read More

Benjamin Franklin’s Appeal to Prayer During Constitutional Convention

The Actual Events as historically documented JUNE 28, 1787: [below is the speech by Benjamin Franklin and the reports of other who have been recorded as having spoken. As recorded by James Madison and published for the first time in 1840.] Mr. President, The small progress we have made after 4 or five weeks close attendance & continual reasonings with each other---our different sentiments on almost every question, several of the last producing as many noes as ays, is methinks a melancholy proof of the imperfection of the Human Understanding. We indeed seem to feel our own want of ...
Read More

George Washington Inspires a Tired and Defeated Army to Continue the Fight for Liberty

George Washington faced a grim moment January 1, 1777. All enlistments for the Continental Army had expired on that date and all of the army, or at least what was left of it, was free to go home. This would not just cripple the Revolution, but probably end it. He gathered his troops together, the drum roll began, and the general asked all those willing to extend their tours to step forward. Not one soul moved. Then, as Tim Ballard tells it in his book The Washington Hypothesis, “A depressed Washington turned his horse and began riding away. Then ...
Read More

The Declaration of Independence Approved by Congress as 56 Courageous Signers “Pledge… Our Lives, Our Fortunes, and Our Sacred Honor.”

On July 4th, 1776, US Congress approved the Declaration of Independence from England and declares the God-given unalienable rights of the American people to pursue happiness, not to be the property of a government to be mistreated. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zw6sKtXDCZk When the First Continental Congress adjourned in October of 1774, the delegates agreed to meet again in Philadelphia on May 5, 1775. Between the First and the Second Continental Congress, many events happened that increased the tensions between the British and the Colonists. The battles of Lexington and Concord, the Colonist defeat in Quebec. The Colonists tried to establish their rights and to fight against ...
Read More

The First Official Act of Congress: A Call to Prayer!

The first official act of Congress was a call to prayer that the Rev. Mr. Duché be desired to open the Congress tomorrow morning with prayers, at the Carpenter's Hall, at 9 o'clock." When the Congress met, Mr. Cushing made a motion that it should be opened with Prayer. It was opposed by Mr. Jay of New York and Mr. Rutledge of South Carolina because we were so divided in religious sentiments, some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship. Mr. Samuel Adams arose and said, "that ...
Read More

The First Continental Congress Secretly Meets in Philadelphia to Discuss British Tyranny

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbGDKitNf04 On September 5, 1774, every colony but Georgia sent representatives to what is now called the First Continental Congress. They met in secret because they did not want the British to know that the colonies were uniting. At first there were 44 delegates who met in Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia. Twelve other delegates reported late. Some of those who came were George Washington, Patrick Henry, John Jay, John Adams, and Samuel Adams. Peyton Randolph of Virginia was chosen president. Joseph Galloway from Pennsylvania suggested they work out a way that the colonies could have their freedom under British ...
Read More

The Miraculous Story of ‘The Bulletproof President’, George Washington

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebHXYUwX7HY The miraculous story of 'The Bulletproof President' once appeared in virtually every student text in America. At the Battle at the Monongahela, Washington and the British army were ambushed by the French. Every officer on horseback was killed except Washington. He later wrote to his brother John on July 18, 1755: But by the all-powerful dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me. The French ...
Read More