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Fight for Freedom / Independence

BREXIT. Britain votes to leave the EU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XKJ2mcdVmQ After more than four decades of being shackled to the European Union (previously the European Economic Community), Great Britain declared its independence. The vote for Brexit (52 percent of Britons cast ballots to leave the EU) is a vote for sovereignty and self-determination. Britain will no longer be subject to European legislation, with Britain’s Parliament retaking control. British judges will no longer be overruled by the European Court of Justice, and British businesses will be liberated from mountains of EU regulations, which have undermined economic liberty. The majority of the votes to leave were by the older Britons, with ...
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Ukraine’s Euromaidan Protests Begin – The Revolution of Dignity

Article by: Borislaw Bilash II In November 2013, President Viktor Yanukovych announced that Ukraine was suspending pursuit of the Ukraine-European Union Association Agreement for which the country had been preparing for since 2008.  The announcement led to the largest peaceful protests seen at the Maidan in Kyiv since the Orange Revolution of 2004. On November 30, 2013, at 4:00 a.m., as the protests dwindled, the Berkut Special Police forcefully dispersed a few hundred student-aged protesters who remained at the square, beating some with truncheons. The Ukrainian government provoked the violence by busing in thousands of plain-clothed goons and infiltrated the ...
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The Orange Revolution: The Ukraines Fight Against Election Fraud

The 2004 Orange Revolution in Ukraine was a massive demonstration of people for democracy and against electoral fraud. Millions braved freezing weather conditions to fight against stolen elections. The award winning film THE ORANGE CHRONICLES is a powerfully moving and unique examination of Ukraine's Orange Revolution from the perspective of an intrepid Ukrainian-American filmmaker. Director Damian Kolodiy, criss-crossed the country in the weeks before the remarkable events of 2004 as a volunteer International Election Observer, recording the build-up to what turned out to be one of the most astonishing bloodless political turnarounds in recent history. Below is an abridged version of ...
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Tiananmen Square Political Protests and Massacre in Beijing, China

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Gtt2JxmQtg Most people in the western world remember the Tiananmen Square Massacre this way: 1) Students protest for democracy in Beijing, China, in June of 1989. 2) Chinese government sends troops and tanks to Tiananmen Square. 3) Student protesters are brutally massacred. In essence, this is a fairly accurate depiction of what happened around Tiananmen Square, but the situation was much longer-lasting and more chaotic than this outline suggests. The protests actually started in April of 1989, as public demonstrations of mourning for former Communist Party Secretary General Hu Yaobang. A high government official's funeral seems like an unlikely ...
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Martin Luther King Delivers His Iconic “I Have a Dream” Speech on the Steps at Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, and it has since become one of the most famous orations in history. You’ve seen the clips and heard its most famous lines on countless occasions, but here are some of the things you probably didn’t know about how the speech was written, how it was delivered, and how it was received. 1. King had previously used his “dream” rhetoric before — “many times before,” as he acknowledged — in lesser-known speeches. 2. King may have taken the "dream" language from then-22-year-old ...
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India’s Independence Day is Declared from Britain, but Did India Really Become Independent?

The day India supposed gained its independence from Britain, however the unadorned truth is, India attained only the status of a self-ruled colony of the British régime. The 1947 partition was cooked up by the British and Western powerbrokers, at the behest of Gandhi and Jinnah's feudal policy followers who overnight became the new rulers. Most of these new kings (and queens) neither made any personal sacrifices during the 100-year-long, glorious independence struggle. The hundreds of thousands of young men and women who gave their lives to bring about the "azadi" were excluded from the post-partition power structure, and ...
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The Royal Indian Mutiny Begins an Uprising Against Britain

On December 27th, 1965 Utpal Dutt, the actor who played comedian in one of most memorable role in Hindi Cinema in Golmaal, was arrested by the Government of West Bengal under the Preventive Detention Act. The Government of Bengal and India feared he was “subversive”. Why? Because he wrote a play called “Kallol” (Sound of Waves) on an important chapter of Indian Freedom that is never mentioned in any official History book. The Royal Indian Navy Mutiny (or Naval Uprising) of 1946. The Beginning British were in trouble in 1946. Indians in the Armed forces were no longer trust worthy ...
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Xinhai Revolution (China): The Wuchang Uprising in China’s Battle for Freedom led by Huang Xing

The Chinese Revolution of 1911, also called Xinhai Revolution (辛亥革命) after the year of the Chinese calendar in which it occurred, was an uprising that led to the fall of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) and to the foundation of the Republic of China (中華民國, ROC). The revolt began on October 9th when the accidental explosion of a bomb drew the attention of the local police to a house in Wuchang’s Russian Settlement. The house was searched and a list of names of revolutionaries was found. Since the incident had exposed their plans and identities, the insurgents decided to strike at ...
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Abraham Lincoln’s Delivers his Gettysburg Address

On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner referred to the most famous speech ever given by President Abraham Lincoln. In his eulogy on the slain president, he called the Gettysburg Address a "monumental act." He said Lincoln was mistaken that "the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here." Rather, the Bostonian remarked, "The world noted at once what he said, and will never cease to remember it. The battle itself was less important than the speech." There are five known copies of the speech in Lincoln's handwriting, each with a slightly different text, and named ...
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John Brown Raided the Federal Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry to Obtain Arms for a Slave Insurrection

Just after sundown on the evening of Sunday October 16, 1859 John Brown led a group of 21 men (16 white and 5 black) across the Potomac River from Maryland to Virginia. Their immediate objective was the capture of the cache of weapons stored at the U.S. Arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Brown's ultimate goal was to destroy the slave system of the South. The arms captured by the raid would allow Brown and his followers to establish a stronghold in the near-by mountains from which they could attack slaveholders and draw liberated slaves into their ranks. Brown's raid attained initial ...
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Abolitionist Frederick Douglass Gives Iconic “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro” Speech

Frederick Douglass (1818-95) was a prominent American abolitionist, author and orator. Born a slave, Douglass escaped at age 20 and went on to become a world-renowned anti-slavery activist. His three autobiographies are considered important works of the slave narrative tradition as well as classics of American autobiography. Douglass’ work as a reformer ranged from his abolitionist activities in the early 1840s to his attacks on Jim Crow and lynching in the 1890s. For 16 years he edited an influential black newspaper and achieved international fame as an inspiring and persuasive speaker and writer. In thousands of speeches and editorials, ...
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First Major Revolt in the Austrian Revolution for Independence Occurred in Vienna by University Students Demanding a Constitution Guaranteeing their Rights

Emperor Ferdinand and his chief advisor Metternich directed troops to crush the demonstration. Peaceful student demonstrators were shot and killed causing the working class to join the demonstrations, developing an armed insurrection demanding Metternich's resignation. Ferdinand reluctantly complied and dismissed him, and tried to appease the people with a cleverly written constitution, but they rejected it. He later issued two manifestos which gave concessions to the people, but demonstrations continued until August 23 when Austrian troops opened fire on unarmed demonstrators. University students mounted a large street demonstration in Vienna, and it was covered by the press across the German-speaking states ...
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Francis Scott Key Penned the Poem, the ‘Star Spangled Banner’, Later to Become the National Anthem, pub

Francis Scott Key penned the words to the US National Anthem after watching the bombardment for 25 hours and seeing “Bombs bursting in air, missiles, so much debris, he strained to see. Was the flag still there? He couldn’t see a thing. All night long, he couldn’t. At the crack of dawn, he ran out to the banister, and he looked, straining his eyes, but all he could see was dust and debris, and then there was a clearing, and he beheld the most beautiful sight he had ever seen: The torn and tattered stars and stripes, still waving." ...
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William Wilberforce gives His Passionate “Abolition Speech” to the House of Commons to Convince them that Slavery Must be Abolished

William Wilberforce was a member of the British Parliament who converted to Christianity and later became an abolitionist. As a Christian, he sought to reform the evils within himself and the world and since one of the glaring moral issues of his day was slavery, he read up on the subject and met some anti-slavery activists. On May 12, 1789, he delivered his Abolition Speech before the House of Commons where he passionately made his case as to why the slave trade must be abolished. He also introduced a bill to abolish the trade and though it failed, it ...
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John Adams: “Posterity! You Will Never Know, How Much it Cost the Present Generation, to Preserve Your Freedom! I Hope You Will Make a Good Use of It.”

Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, Saturday Evening 26 April 1777 I have been lately more remiss, than usual in Writing to you. There has been a great Dearth of News. Nothing from England, nothing from France, Spain, or any other Part of Europe, nothing from the West Indies. Nothing from Howe, and his Banditti, nothing from General Washington. There are various Conjectures that Lord How is dead, sick, or gone to England, as the Proclamations run in the Name of Will. Howe only, and nobody from New York can tell any Thing of his Lordship. I am wearied ...
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The Declaration of Independence Approved by Congress as 56 Courageous Signers “Pledge… Our Lives, Our Fortunes, and Our Sacred Honor.”

On July 4th, 1776, US Congress approved the Declaration of Independence from England and declares the God-given unalienable rights of the American people to pursue happiness, not to be the property of a government to be mistreated. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zw6sKtXDCZk When the First Continental Congress adjourned in October of 1774, the delegates agreed to meet again in Philadelphia on May 5, 1775. Between the First and the Second Continental Congress, many events happened that increased the tensions between the British and the Colonists. The battles of Lexington and Concord, the Colonist defeat in Quebec. The Colonists tried to establish their rights and to fight against ...
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Battle of Dorchester: General Washington Bold Plan to Take Back Boston is Foiled by Weather, but Maybe God kept His Young Army from a Battle they Could Not Win

Gen. Washington's bold plan to take back Boston, would have trapped him on Dorchester Heights early in the war without an escape route in which had saved the patriots several times when they found they were outmatched by the well-trained British troops. But, a sudden, unexpected storm had saved Washington and his young army and had given him time to develop military strategies that would make the inexperienced American army more effective. Early in the war, the most effective strategy for the Americans was to fight, then retreat so that the inexperienced Continental Army would not engage the more ...
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Thomas Paine’s ‘Common Sense’ is Published

Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense in January 1776, but it was not published as a pamphlet until February 14, 1776. He wanted people to think about what was really happening. He explained that the people must fight against the unfair and unjust ways of King George III and the British Parliament. He used plain, simple common sense in his writing to show the Colonists that there was no other way to protect their rights, but to declare independence from their mother country who was treating them poorly. He talked about government being a necessary evil which could be made ...
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The Legend of Reverend John Peter Gabriel Muhlenburg: Reverend to General

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPo3SjqOhMI Toward the end of 1775, Muhlenberg was authorized to raise and command as its colonel the 8th Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army. After George Washington personally asked him to accept this task, he agreed. However, his brother Fredrick Augustus Muhlenberg, who was also a minister, did not approve of him going into the army until the British burned down his own church in front of him. Then he joined the military himself. According to a biography written by his great nephew in the mid-19th century, on January 21, 1776 in the Lutheran church in Woodstock, Virginia, Reverend Muhlenberg ...
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Thomas Jefferson: “We are Reduced to the Alternative of Choosing an Unconditional Submission to Tyranny, or Resistance by Force. The Latter is our Choice!”

The Continental Congress issued A Declaration by the Representatives of the United Colonies of North-America, Now Met in Congress at Philadelphia, Setting Forth the Causes and Necessity of Their Taking Up Arms. This was written by Thomas Jefferson and Pennsylvania lawyer John Dickinson. In response to England sending soldiers to "restore order" in the colonies, Jefferson wrote: We are reduced to the alternative of choosing an unconditional submission to the tyranny of irritated ministers, or resistance by force.—The latter is our choice—We have counted the cost of this contest, and find nothing so dreadful as voluntary slavery… —Honour, justice, and humanity, ...
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Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys Capture Fort Ticonderoga in New York from the British

The Green Mountain Boys  invaded Fort Ticonderoga in New York and under the leadership of Ethan Allen captured the fort from the British. They demanded the surrender of the sleeping British soldiers "in the name of the great Jehovah and the Continental Congress." With the fort they captured cannons and mortars that were sent to New England where they were used on the heights of Boston Harbor. These cannons and mortars played a big part in forcing the British to leave Boston Harbor. The Green Mountain Boys were able to defend their liberty and the freedom of the American settlers because ...
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The Start of the Revolutionary War: The Battle of Lexington & Concord begins with the Shot Heard ‘Round the World

At Lexington Green, MA, the British were met by approximately seventy American Minute Men led by John Parker in a British attempt to confiscate American arms. At the North Bridge in Concord, the British were confronted again, this time by 300-400 armed colonists, and were forced to march back to Boston with the Americans firing on them all the way. By the end of the day, the colonists were singing “Yankee Doodle” and the American Revolution had begun. With the Americans pushing back against the British use of military force to seize their firearms, Gen. Gage sought to offer ...
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Patrick Henry Gives his ‘Give me Liberty, or Give me Death’ Speech

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHo-3LEcgQE On March 23, 1775, less than a month before the beginning of the Revolutionary War, Patrick Henry addressed the House of Burgesses in Richmond, Virginia. He gave a speech that has been remembered popularly as the “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech. Although Henry’s discourse was not recorded at the time (partially because Henry delivered it extemporaneously), Henry’s biographer, William Wirt, later gathered testimony from people who had heard him speak. Through their accounts, Wirt reconstructed what Henry spoke that day. The motivation behind the speech was to incite the determination of the Virginia House members ...
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The Continental Association was Created by the Continental Congress in Response to the Intolerable Acts

The Continental Association was created by the Continental Congress in 1774 in response to the Coercive Acts, or 'Intolerable Acts', which had been passed by the British Parliament to restore order in Massachusetts following the Boston Tea Party. One of the first acts of the First Continental Congress was to create the Continental Association of 1774, more commonly known as "The Association". The Continental Congress created the Articles of Association that were adopted on October 20, 1774. The Continental Association (also known as Articles of Association or simply the Association), was an agreement made by the American colonies to ...
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The First Continental Congress Secretly Meets in Philadelphia to Discuss British Tyranny

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbGDKitNf04 On September 5, 1774, every colony but Georgia sent representatives to what is now called the First Continental Congress. They met in secret because they did not want the British to know that the colonies were uniting. At first there were 44 delegates who met in Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia. Twelve other delegates reported late. Some of those who came were George Washington, Patrick Henry, John Jay, John Adams, and Samuel Adams. Peyton Randolph of Virginia was chosen president. Joseph Galloway from Pennsylvania suggested they work out a way that the colonies could have their freedom under British ...
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