Fast and Prayer 2017-12-01T00:58:49+00:00

Lee v. Weisman: Supreme Court Ruled 5-4 that Prayers During School Graduation Violate the Establishment Clause

In the case of Lee vs. Weisman, The Supreme Court ruled that for an adult to mention the word God at a public graduation constituted both psychological and religious coercion against his students. Yet, consider the actions of William Samuel Johnson, a signer of the Constitution and one of America’s leading educators who served as the first president of Columbia College. At his graduation exercises William Samuel Johnson declared to the students, “You, this day, have received a public education. The purpose whereof had been to qualify you better to serve your Creator and your country. Your first great duties, ...
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Congress Begins Reviewing a Document Entitled ‘Communist Goals for Taking Over America’

The House of Representative and later the Senate began reviewing a document entitled "Communist Goals for Taking Over America." It contained an agenda of 45 separate issues that, in hindsight was quite shocking back then and equally shocking today. Here, in part, are some key points listed in that document. 1. U.S. acceptance of coexistence as the only alternative to atomic war. 2. U.S. willingness to capitulate in preference to engaging in atomic war. 3. Develop the illusion that total disarmament [by] the US would be a demonstration of moral strength. 4. Permit free trade between all nations regardless ...
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Engel v. Vitale: Supreme Court Rules School Prayer Unconstitutional

The New York school system had adopted a prayer to be said before the start of each day's classes. This prayer was to help promote good moral character of the students, spiritual training and help combat juvenile delinquency. The regents wrote a prayer for the schools which had to be non-sectarian or denominational. It was so bland that it became known to some religious leaders as the "to whom it may concern prayer." Here is the Regents prayer. Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence upon thee, and we beg Thy blessings upon us, our parents, our teachers and our ...
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The Battle of Lake Erie: The Capt. Oliver Hazard Perry Miracle

Captain Oliver Hazard Perry, with many of his sailors being free blacks, confronted  the British squadron of six vessels, commanded by the one-armed Commodore Robert  Barclay, who had helped defeat Napoleon's fleet. Strong winds prevented Perry from getting into a safe position. Long-range British cannons crippled his flagship, USS Lawrence, killing most of his crew. Faithful to his battle flag, "DON'T GIVE UP THE SHIP," the 28-year-old Perry and his men courageously rowed a half mile through heavy gunfire to the USS Niagara. The wind suddenly changed directions and Perry sailed directly across the British line, firing broadside. After 15 ...
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John Adams Issues a Proclamation for a National Day of Humiliation, Fasting, and Prayer for the Protection & Blessings of the Almighty God for the new Nation

A national day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer was issued by President John Adams declaring May 9, 1798 the day of fasting for the nation. The proclamation reads below: A PROCLAMATION AS the safety and prosperity of nations ultimately and essentially depend on the protection and blessing of Almighty God; and the national acknowledgment of this truth is not only an indispensable duty which the people owe to Him, but a duty whose natural influence is favorable to the promotion of that morality and piety, without which social happiness cannot exist, nor the blessings of a free government be ...
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Washington’s Thanksgiving Proclamation: America’s First Federal Thanksgiving

Following a resolution of Congress, President George Washington proclaimed Thursday the 26th of November 1789 a day of “public thanksgiving and prayer” devoted to “the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be.” Reflecting American religious practice, Presidents and Congresses from the beginning of the republic have from time to time designated days of fasting and thanksgiving (the Thanksgiving holiday we continue to celebrate in November was established by Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War and made into law by Congress in 1941) ...
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Inauguration of President Washington: He Gives a Religious Address and Places Hand on Bible Verse as Promise of America as a Covenant Nation?

David Barton of Wallbuilders gives some details of the inauguration of the first President of the U.S.: Constitutional experts abounded in 1789 at America’s first presidential inauguration. Not only was the inauguree a signer of the Constitution but one fourth of the members of the Congress that organized and directed his inauguration had been delegates with him to the Constitutional Convention that produced the Constitution. Furthermore, this very same Congress also penned the First Amendment and its religious clauses. Because Congress, perhaps more than any other, certainly knew what was constitutional, the religious activities that were part of the first ...
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Benjamin Franklin’s Appeal to Prayer During Constitutional Convention

The Actual Events as historically documented JUNE 28, 1787: [below is the speech by Benjamin Franklin and the reports of other who have been recorded as having spoken. As recorded by James Madison and published for the first time in 1840.] Mr. President, The small progress we have made after 4 or five weeks close attendance & continual reasonings with each other---our different sentiments on almost every question, several of the last producing as many noes as ays, is methinks a melancholy proof of the imperfection of the Human Understanding. We indeed seem to feel our own want of ...
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The Constitutional Convention Begins in Philadelphia on May 25th and Ends on Sept 17th with the Miracle of the Constitution

The Constitutional Convention takes place in Philadelphia and, by the account of many participants during the process, ends with a miracle of divine providence in the formation of the constitution that provided the American people with a people's government assuring their rights and freedom, with a balance of powers, and equal representation for all states. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-bmAqhMrX4 "Miracle at Philadelphia " is in fact a quote from a letter written by George Washington. James Madison also used it in writing to friends. In 1787 there is much tension and dissension between the States which started soon after the war of ...
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Did Isaac Potts Really See Washington Pray at Valley Forge?

One of the legends or myths of Valley Forge is that Washington prayed for his country here. We do not say that he did not pray at Valley Forge (he assuredly did), there simply is an open question as to how he did so and if he actually was witnessed in prayer. Although this article has been added with a date of January 17, 1778, the actual day is unknown. There are a number of artists who represent Washington kneeling in prayer, some in the snow, some in the grass of a glade in the woods. There are even ...
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The Continental Congress made a National Thanksgiving Day Proclamation

As printed in the Journals of Congress below... IN CONGRESS – November 1, 1777 Forasmuch as it is the indispensable duty of all men to adore the superintending providence of Almighty God; to acknowledge with gratitude their obligation to him for benefits received, and to implore such farther blessings as they stand in need of; and it having pleased him in his abundant mercy not only to continue to us the innumerable bounties of his common providence, but also smile upon us in the prosecution of a just and necessary war, for the defense and establishment of our unalienable ...
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Continental Congress Calls for a Day of Fasting and Humiliation for the Soldiers

Because of the distressing condition of the tattered but unbowed soldiers, the American Continental Congress called for a day of fasting and humiliation: Resolved, That it be recommended to all the United States, as soon as possible to appoint a day of solemn fasting and humiliation; to implore of Almighty God the forgiveness of the many sins prevailing among all ranks, and to beg the countenance and assistance of his Providence in the prosecution of the present just and necessary war. Shortly after the resolution on fasting, three important events occurred. On 13 December 1776, General Howe disclosed his decision to ...
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George Washington Orders his Troops to Observe the Day of Fasting, Humiliation, and Prayer for the ‘Giver of Victory to Prosper Our Arms’

The rag-tag and green Continental Army would need heaven’s help. In April 1776, they arrived in New York, a city with a large population of Loyalists and surrounded by water that was conducive to a British naval attack. By June the British fleet arrived in the harbor with some four hundred ships. It was at this time, the largest force ever sent forth by one nation to another. One of Washington’s men wrote, “I declare that I thought all London was afloat.” The Americans numbered well under half of the British troops, but they did have a promise of ...
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General William Livingston Made a Resolution of Congress that May 17th Should be Observed by All Colonies as a Day of Humiliation, Fast, and Prayer

General William Livingston made a resolution to Congress which passed without dissent: “We earnestly recommend that Friday, the 17th day of May be observed by the colonies as a day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer, that we may with united hearts confess and bewail our manifold sins and transgressions … and by a sincere repentance … appease God’s righteous displeasure, and through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ obtain His pardon and forgiveness.” In times of impending calamity and distress; when the liberties of America are imminently endangered by the secret machinations and open assaults of an insidious ...
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The First Prayer of Congress on September 7, 1774

The first session of the Continental Congress opened the beginning of September in the year 1774 with prayer in Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia. Threatened by the most powerful monarch in the world, Britain’s King George III, America’s founding fathers heard Rev. Jacob Duché begin by reading Psalm 35, the Anglican Book of Common Prayer’s “Psalter” for that day Sept. 7, 1774: “Plead my cause, Oh, Lord, with them that strive with me, fight against them that fight against me. Take hold of buckler and shield, and rise up for my help. Draw also the spear and the battle-axe to meet ...
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The First Official Act of Congress: A Call to Prayer!

The first official act of Congress was a call to prayer that the Rev. Mr. Duché be desired to open the Congress tomorrow morning with prayers, at the Carpenter's Hall, at 9 o'clock." When the Congress met, Mr. Cushing made a motion that it should be opened with Prayer. It was opposed by Mr. Jay of New York and Mr. Rutledge of South Carolina because we were so divided in religious sentiments, some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship. Mr. Samuel Adams arose and said, "that ...
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The First of the Intolerable Acts, the Boston Port Act, is Passed by Congress

The Boston Port Act was passed by the Parliament of Great Britain March 31, 1774. The Boston Port Act was designed to punish the inhabitants of Boston, Massachusetts for the incident that would become known as the Boston Tea Party. The Port Act was one of a series of British Laws referred to as the Intolerable Acts passed by the Parliament of Great Britain 1774. The Boston Port Act was to close the port until the tea that had been destroyed at the Boston Tea Party and that payments were made to the East India Company paid for the lost tea ...
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Young America’s Miraculous Defeat of the French Fleet

On this day, a national fast was observed throughout America for the Lord to protect them as a fleet and armament to recover... Novascotia, and to lay waste the whole seacoast from Novascotia to Georgia. A large fleet of 70 ships neared the coast when Reverend Prince at the Old South Meeting House in Boston (as well as ministers throughout America) prayed for help. Historian Catherine Drinker Bowen relates that, "That very night God sent upon them a more dreadful storm than either of the former, and completed their destruction. Some overset, some foundered, and a remnant only of ...
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The First Thanksgiving Occurred between Sept 21st and Nov 9th, 1621

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BQSOkkoDjc The unfamiliar American soil presented problems to the Pilgrims, but an Indian named Samoset greeted them and taught them how to fertilize best fertilize the soil. The results (months later) were spectacular, and the Pilgrims had much to be thankful for in the new land. About 100 Indians were invited to share in a thanksgiving feast of those first bumper crops of beans, squash, corn, barley, and peas. The Indians brought fresh venison and turkey and other fowl was provided by the Pilgrims, and enjoyed a meal together sitting on the ground under the bright fall foliage of ...
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