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Canada

The first people in Canada crossed the Bering Straits from Asia. In the north the Inuit lived by hunting seals, walruses and whales. They also hunted caribou. On the west coast people hunted deer, bear and beaver. They also fished. On the plains people lived by hunting buffalo. In the east people grew crops of beans, squash, maize and sunflower seeds.

The first Europeans to reach Canada were the Vikings. In 986 a Viking called Bjarni Herjolfsson was blown off course by a storm and he spotted a new land. However he sailed away without landing. In 1001 a man named Leif Eriksson landed in the new land, which he named Vinland (it was part of Canada). However Eriksson did not stay permanently. Later the Vikings did establish a colony in North America but they abandoned it because of conflict with the natives.

However after the Vikings Canada was forgotten until the end of the 15th century. In 1497 the English king Henry VII sent an Italian named Jean Cabot on an expedition across the Atlantic to Newfoundland. Cabot discovered rich fishing waters off the coast of Canada.Read More...

Then in 1534 and in 1535-36 a Frenchman named Jacques Cartier (1491-1557) sailed on two expeditions to Canada. On 10 August 1535 (St Lawrence’s Day) he sailed into the St Lawrence River, which he named after the saint.

CANADA IN THE 17th CENTURY

However no permanent European settlements were made in Canada until the early 17th century. In 1603 a Frenchman named Samuel de Champlain (1567-1635) sailed up the St Lawrence River. In 1604 he founded Port Royal in Acadia (Nova Scotia). In 1608 de Champlain founded Quebec. (The name Quebec is believed to be an Algonquin word meaning a narrow part of a river). In 1642 the French founded Montreal. The new colony in Canada was called New France. By 1685 the population of New France was about 10,000. By 1740 it was 48,000.

In the early 17th century French missionaries such as the Jesuits attempted to convert the natives of Canada to Christianity – without much success. Meanwhile the French settlers traded with the natives for furs and farmed the land. Unfortunately they also brought European diseases like smallpox, to which the natives had no resistance.

However the English were also interested in Canada. In 1610 Henry Hudson discovered Hudson Bay. (In 1611 his crew mutinied and set him adrift). In 1631 Thomas James led another expedition. James Bay is named after him. Then in 1629 the English captured Quebec. However it was returned to France in 1632.

In 1670 the English founded the Hudson Bay Company. The company was given exclusive rights to trade with the inhabitants of the Hudson Bay area. They traded with the natives for skins and furs. Meanwhile rivalry between the British and the French in Canada continued.

CANADA IN THE 18th CENTURY

After the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1713) France was forced to recognize British control of Hudson Bay and Newfoundland. The French were also forced to cede Nova Scotia to Britain.

However more conflict between Britain and France was inevitable. During the Seven Years War (1756-1763) the two nations fought for control of Canada. In 1758 the British captured the French fortress of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island. Then in 1759 General Wolfe captured the city of Quebec. (Wolfe’s victory at Quebec ensured that Canada would become British rather than French). Then in 1760 the British captured Montreal. Finally in 1763 the French were forced to surrender all their territories in Canada to Britain by the Treaty of Paris.

The British were then left with the problem of how to deal with the French Canadians. Wisely they decided to treat them gently and the Quebec Act of 1774 allowed the French Canadians to practice their own religion (Roman Catholicism). The French Canadians were also allowed to keep French civil law alongside British criminal law. By 1775 Canada had a population of about 90,000. The colony was flourishing.

When the American Revolution began in 1775 the Americans hoped the French Canadians would join them. However they were disappointed. An American army entered Canada in September 1775 and captured Montreal in November. However an attempt to capture Quebec in December failed and the American soldiers retreated in 1776.

After the American Revolutionary War about 40,000 Americans who remained loyal to Britain migrated from the newly independent country to Canada.

Then in 1791 the British parliament passed another act, which divided the Lawrence River Valley into two parts, Upper and Lower Canada. (Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were not affected).

Meanwhile exploration continued. George Vancouver (1757-1798) sailed along the west coast of Canada in 1791-94. Vancouver Island is named after him. Alexander Mackenzie (1755-1820) traveled from Great Slave Lake along the Mackenzie River and reached the Arctic Ocean in 1789. In 1793 he crossed the continent by land and reached the Pacific.

During the American War of 1812 the Americans invaded Canada but they were repulsed.

CANADA IN THE 19th CENTURY

Meanwhile in the early 19th century the population of Canada grew rapidly boosted by many migrants from Britain. A shipbuilding industry flourished in Canada and canals were built to help commerce.

However in the early 19th century many Canadians became dissatisfied with their government. In 1791 both Lower and Upper Canada were allowed an elected legislature. However the king appointed councils with executive powers. Yet both French and English speaking Canadians wanted a more democratic form of government.

Eventually in 1837 some Canadians rebelled. Louis Joseph Papineau led an uprising of French Canadians. However the rebellion was soon crushed. In Upper Canada William Lyon Mackenzie, who became the first Mayor of Toronto in 1834, led the insurrection. In 1837 he led an uprising, which was quickly crushed. Mackenzie himself was killed.

However Canada finally gained democratic government in 1867 when Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were federated as the Dominion of Canada. Canada then had a strong central government, which ruled from Ottawa, the new capital. The first prime minister of Canada was Sir John Macdonald.

Manitoba was made a province in 1870. British Columbia joined the confederation in 1871. Alberta and Saskatchewan joined in 1905.

In the late 19th century and the early 20th century the population of Canada grew rapidly. The Canadian economy also expanded rapidly helped by the spread of railways. A transcontinental railway, the Canadian Pacific Railway was completed in 1885.

Many Britons migrated to Canada and in the early 20th century many Eastern Europeans also migrated there. Vast areas of land were turned over to farming and manufacturing industries boomed.

Meanwhile in 1896 gold was found in the Klondike district of the Yukon and a gold rush ensued.

CANADA IN THE 20th CENTURY

More than 60,000 Canadian men died in the First World War. Meanwhile Manitoba was the first province of Canada to allow women to vote in provincial elections in 1916. Women in Canada were given the right to vote in federal elections in 1918. By 1925 all provinces except Quebec had granted women the right to vote in provincial elections. Quebec finally gave women that right in 1940.

The 1920s were, in general prosperous years for Canada. However like the rest of the world Canada suffered in the depression of the 1930s. Canada suffered from a huge drop in exports of timber, grain and fish. By 1933 unemployment had soared to 23%. The government introduced relief works but economic hardship continued throughout the 1930s. The depression only ended when the Second World War began in 1939. However during World War II 45,000 Canadians were killed.

In the late 20th century the population of Canada grew rapidly. In 1951 it was 16 million. By 1961 it had risen to 18 million. After 1945 people from Southern and Eastern Europe flocked to live in Canada. From the 1960s many immigrants came from South Asia.

Meanwhile during the 1950s and 1960s the Canadian economy boomed and Canada became an affluent society. Meanwhile television began in Canada in 1952. However things turned sour in the 1970s. In the early 1980s Canada suffered a deep recession and unemployment rose to 11%. There was another recession in the early 1990s. Yet Canada recovered.

In 1995 the people of Quebec voted in a referendum not to secede from Canada. Then in 1999 North West Territories was divided into two and a new territory called Nunavut was created.

Meanwhile in 1993 Kim Campbell became the first woman prime minister of Canada.

 

CANADA IN THE 21st CENTURY

Like other countries Canada suffered in the recession of 2009. However Canada soon recovered. In April 2012 unemployment in Canada stood at 8.1%. However by September 2013 it had fallen to 6.9%. Today Canada is a prosperous country and it has vast natural resources. Today the population of Canada is 35 million.

Chronology of Events Related to Canada below:

 

Operation Maple Resolve (Canada) / 133 Target Stores Close Abruptly

May 23- June 6, 2015 - Coinciding with Operation Jade Helm and 5 Super Walmart store abrupt closures in the US, many speculate the abrupt Target store closures and Canadian military Operation Maple Leaf are part of the preparation drill for martial law and are being prepared to be processing and distribution centers when martial law is instituted. According to one source, the significance of the closing of these large department stores coinciding with the large-scale Jade Helm and Maple Resolve operations is the fact that the military will use these stores as military distribution installations. The source states that backdoor logistics software exists ...
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Doctors Slam Big Pharma for Price Gouging Cancer Patients

A group of over 120 cancer doctors released a joint position paper condemning America’s pharmaceutical industry. The cancer specialists accuse the drug industry of ‘profiteering’, ‘price gouging’ and even being ‘immoral’. The group of doctors insists that Big Pharma is charging patients over $100,000 for life-saving drugs that cost only a few dollars to manufacture. Consider the following statistic from Yahoo Health the day the report was released, ‘Of 12 new cancer drugs that received FDA approval last year, 11 of them cost in excess of $100,000 a year—prices that the specialists attack as “astronomical,” “unsustainable,” and maybe even immoral ...
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Common Law Court Indicts several Catholic Popes and the Queen of England among Guilty in Case of 50,000 Missing Children in Canada Citing Satanic Ritual Sacrifices

Convened as a lawfully recognized Tribunal of Conscience in Brussels in the fall of 2012, and issuing its final verdict on February 25, 2013, the Common Law Court named and indicted thirty defendants for perpetrating or concealing Genocide in Canada against indigenous people. These defendants included then-Pope Benedict, Joseph Ratzinger, former Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, Elizabeth Windsor “Queen of England”, and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper. With massive evidence from witnesses, the tribunal extended further and inlate July 2014 found defendants Pope Francis Bergoglio, Catholic Jesuit Superior General Adolfo Pachon and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby guilty of rape, torture, ...
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The Toronto Hearings on 9/11 Terrorist Attack

On the tenth anniversary of the Attacks of September 11th, 2001, expert witnesses gathered at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada to provide evidence-based research that called into question the official story of 9/11. Over a period of four days, these experts in Structural Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and History gave researched and professional testimony to an international panel of distinguished judges. The panel of judges, in conjunction with the steering committee would go on to publish their final analysis of the evidence provided, which called for a new investigation into the Attacks of September 11th, 2001. This film (below) is ...
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Hillary Clinton presented an Ethics Statement to the U.S. Senate Promising not to involve The Clinton Foundation in any way in the business of the U.S. State Department.”

Secretary of State-designate Hillary Clinton on January 5, 2009, in a letter to State Department Designated Agency Ethics Official James H. Thessin: “For the duration of my appointment as Secretary if I am confirmed, I will not participate personally and substantially in any particular matter involving specific parties in which The William J. Clinton Foundation (or the Clinton Global Initiative) is a party or represents a party….” They violated that agreement almost immediately. They took multi-million dollar donations from foreign governments and businesses that had interests before the State Department. Those were never disclosed. According to Bloomberg, there was ...
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Secret Meeting in Banff Plans North American Union (US, Mexico, Canada) Using “Evolution by Stealth”. A Step Towards UN Ruled America.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbqchhsiQbU September 12-14, 2006 - A hush-hush meeting held in Banff, Canada explored the issue of how to sneak a North American Union (NAU) onto the people of the U.S. Canada, and Mexico. What we are talking about is making a de facto merger of the three countries a fait accompli by the time it's too late to reverse it. What else can one believe when the term "evolution by stealth" is used? (For background on the NAU, see this column Illegal Aliens and the Secret Monster Highway (Oct. 9, 2006) and AIM Report America's Borders: Going-Going-Gone! (Dec. 22, 2006). Thanks to the ...
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US, Canada, and Mexican Leaders Meet in Secret to Sign the Security & Prosperity Partnership

President Bush, Mexican President Vicente Fox and then-Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin in Waco, Texas, sign the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) paving the way for a North America Union similar the EU. CNN on NAU / SPP signed by Bush https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WF74R9-5Ytc&t=2s The SPP “working groups” organized within the U.S. Department of Transportation are signing trilateral memoranda of understanding and other agreements with Mexico and Canada designed to accomplish the open borders goal incrementally, below the radar of mainstream media attention, thereby avoiding public scrutiny. Congress is largely unaware that SPP exists, let alone knowledgeable about the extensive work being done ...
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US Sponsored Coup d’Etat in Haiti: An Armed Insurrection to Unseat President Aristide via a Carefully Staged Military-Intelligence Operation

US Sponsored Coup d'Etat in Haiti: An armed insurrection which contributed to unseating President Aristide as a result of a carefully staged military-intelligence operation, involving the US, France and Canada. The 2004 coup had set the stage for the installation of a US puppet government in Port au Prince, which takes orders directly from Washington. Following the destabilization and replacement of the President, the US kept 10,000 armed soldiers there, increasing to 20,000 following the 2010 earthquake, likely a man-made quake. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xl9ZqDhX2c4 by Michel Chossudovsky The Rebel paramilitary army crossed the border from the Dominican Republic in early February ...
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WHO Issued a Global Alert Warning Through Asia for Virus Causing Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). Were Industrial Poisons the Real Cause for the SARS Scare?

On March 15, 2003 the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a global alert warning of a new virus spreading through Asia and causing Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), a potentially fatal disease, similar to pneumonia. Photos from China depicting ballet dancers and bridal parties wearing white masks appeared in western newspapers while health departments across the country issued notices to hospitals detailing the symptoms of the new virus and asking for immediate notification of suspect cases. Until the global alert, reports referred to an “unknown virus” first striking in Guangdong Province, China, although some reports place the origin in ...
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UN’s World Health Organization (WHO) Sends Out Tetanus Vaccine in Philippines and Mexico Laced with Birth Control Drugs

During the early 1990s, the World Health Organization (WHO) had been overseeing massive vaccination campaigns against tetanus in a number of countries, among them Nicaragua, Mexico, and the Philippines. In October 1994, Human Life International (HLI) received a communication from its Mexican affiliate, the Comite' Pro Vida de Mexico, regarding that country's anti-tetanus campaign. Suspicious of the campaign protocols, the Comite' obtained several vials of the vaccine and had them analyzed by chemists. Some of the vials were found to contain human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), a naturally occurring hormone essential for maintaining a pregnancy. hCG and Anti-hCG Antibodies In ...
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Lt. Alan Standorf, one of the First NSA Whistleblowers on Mass Surveillance, Found Dead in the Back of a Car at Reagan Airport

First Lieutenant Alan David Standorf worked with, if not directly for, the National Security Agency at Vint Hill Farms Station, then a U.S. Army/NSA listening post. In 1990, he became a whistleblower and made contact with Danny Casolaro, an investigative journalist. Standorf gave Casolaro information and copies of classified documents to help expose illegal activities including money laundering, bulk data collection and a list of dissidents to be rounded up in the event of an emergency. Standorf’s was murdered and his body hidden in the back of a car that was left at the airport. Several months later, Casolaro died in what has dubiously ...
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Cuba Air Flight 455 Bomb Attack Kills All 73 Passengers. Mastermind Luis Posada Carriles Escapes Prison and Ends up Working for the CIA within a Few Weeks

It was a peaceful Wednesday afternoon in Barbados 35 years ago.  Dalton Guiller had just finished a round of waterskiing and was refueling his boat on shore when a roar in the sky startled him.  A low-flying and apparently damaged airliner was fast approaching from the west toward the beach.  “It didn’t look right.  It was too low.  I then saw the plane rise slightly, bank to the right and crash into the water: nose and wing first,” said Guiller. At the Cave Hill campus of the University of the West Indies in Barbados, Professor Cecilia Karch-Braithwaite also heard ...
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OPEC Enacted an Oil Embargo in Response to US Aid to Israel in the Yom Kippur War. Was it a Planned Crisis to Raise Oil Prices by Henry Kissinger?

The fake US Oil Crisis?: The OPEC oil embargo was a response to American involvement in the 1973 Yom Kippur War. Six days after Egypt and Syria launched a surprise military campaign against Israel to regain territories lost in the June 1967 Six-Day War, the US supplied Israel with arms. In response to this, OAPEC announced an oil embargo against Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the US. Kissinger, knowing at least 2 days prior aided by the NSA (also discussed in May Bilderberg meeting), withheld the info from Nixon and Israel as part of a scheme to increase oil prices. Some "peak oil" writers have ...
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A Catholic Secret Jesuit Order Document called the ‘Magisterial Privilege’ Requires Every New Pope to Participate in a Satanic Ritual of Child Sacrifice

Evidence of a Catholic Jesuit Order document called the “Magisterial Privilege" was presented in a 2014 court case by the Chief Prosecutor. The 2014 international court case involved five judges and 27 jury members from six countries including the USA, considering evidence on over 50,000 missing Canadian, US, Argentine and European children who were suspected victims of an international child sacrificial cult referred to as the Ninth Circle. The record dated Dec. 25 1967 was said to show that every new Pope was required to participate in Ninth Circle Satanic ritual sacrifices of newborn children, including drinking their blood ...
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The War of 1812 Begins. Who Started It? Why? And What was the Outcome?

There were two major reasons given for the war. First, Britain was at war with France since 1793. For twenty years the British claimed they had the right – as a legitimate and necessary wartime measure — to intercept American ships on the high seas, seize and keep their cargoes, and search the crews for British navy deserters. The British between 1807 and 1812 seized some 400 American ships and cargoes worth millions of dollars. Second, was the British practice of ‘impressment’. A chronic manpower shortage in the Royal Navy led the Brits to stop American merchant vessels on ...
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