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American miracles

 

Award Winning Investigative Journalist, Atheist, and Editor at the Chicago Tribune, Lee Strobel, is Baptized after Setting Out to Prove to His Wife that Christianity was a Hoax.

Strobel was awarded a slew of awards in 1980 for his investigative journalism and was promoted to legal affairs editor for the Chicago Tribune. His investigation to prove that their was no resurrection and that Christianity was hoax began when his wife, Leslie, became a Christian. Using his journalistic and legal training to disprove the claims of Christ soon became his full focus. Strobel's investigations led him to interview some of the leading scholars on Evangelicalism and Christianity, offering them an opportunity to defend their views. Although his intention going into the research was to prove that God did ...
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Thomas Jefferson & John Adams Die on the 50th Anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence, Fulfilling Dr. Benjamin Rush’s Prophesy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUPEHQGE2xg The Dream of Dr. Benjamin Rush & God’s Hand in Reconciling John Adams and Thomas Jefferson One of the more bitter aspects of the retirement of John Adams from the presidency in 1800 was the fact that several of those with whom he had early co-labored during the Revolution had become his fervent adversaries. This was especially true in the case of Thomas Jefferson who, although serving closely with Adams during the Revolution, had become one of his chief enemies during President Washington’s administration. This feud not only deeply embittered Adams emotionally but it also troubled Dr. Rush, ...
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Francis Scott Key Penned the Poem, the ‘Star Spangled Banner’, Later to Become the National Anthem, pub

Francis Scott Key penned the words to the US National Anthem after watching the bombardment for 25 hours and seeing “Bombs bursting in air, missiles, so much debris, he strained to see. Was the flag still there? He couldn’t see a thing. All night long, he couldn’t. At the crack of dawn, he ran out to the banister, and he looked, straining his eyes, but all he could see was dust and debris, and then there was a clearing, and he beheld the most beautiful sight he had ever seen: The torn and tattered stars and stripes, still waving." ...
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The Battle of Lake Erie: The Capt. Oliver Hazard Perry Miracle

Captain Oliver Hazard Perry, with many of his sailors being free blacks, confronted  the British squadron of six vessels, commanded by the one-armed Commodore Robert  Barclay, who had helped defeat Napoleon's fleet. Strong winds prevented Perry from getting into a safe position. Long-range British cannons crippled his flagship, USS Lawrence, killing most of his crew. Faithful to his battle flag, "DON'T GIVE UP THE SHIP," the 28-year-old Perry and his men courageously rowed a half mile through heavy gunfire to the USS Niagara. The wind suddenly changed directions and Perry sailed directly across the British line, firing broadside. After 15 ...
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Inauguration of President Washington: He Gives a Religious Address and Places Hand on Bible Verse as Promise of America as a Covenant Nation?

David Barton of Wallbuilders gives some details of the inauguration of the first President of the U.S.: Constitutional experts abounded in 1789 at America’s first presidential inauguration. Not only was the inauguree a signer of the Constitution but one fourth of the members of the Congress that organized and directed his inauguration had been delegates with him to the Constitutional Convention that produced the Constitution. Furthermore, this very same Congress also penned the First Amendment and its religious clauses. Because Congress, perhaps more than any other, certainly knew what was constitutional, the religious activities that were part of the first ...
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George Washington: “It appears to me, then, little short of a miracle, that the delegates from so many different states should unite in forming a system of national Government”

In a letter from Washington to Lafayette on 7 Feb. 1788: “It appears to me, then, little short of a miracle, that the delegates from so many different states (which states you know are also different from each other in their manners, circumstances, and prejudices) should unite in forming a system of national Government, so little liable to well-founded objections.” - quoted in Catherine Drinker Bowen, Miracle at Philadelphia, Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1966, p. xvii. It was a miracle. Consider the setting. The thirteen colonies and three and one-half million Americans who had won independence from the ...
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Signing of the Constitution

In a warm room in Philadelphia, 39 men signed the document that formed our nation. With each passing year, America continues her record of having the longest on-going constitutional republic in history. The Constitution. In its seven Articles of some 4500 words, the original Constitution is the “supreme Law of the Land,” distributing powers to three branches of government and the states, and denying others. By beginning “We the People,” the Preamble makes the Constitution the creation of the American people, not the States. Article I (Congress): All of the legislative powers “herein granted” by the new Constitution to Congress are ...
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The Constitutional Convention Begins in Philadelphia on May 25th and Ends on Sept 17th with the Miracle of the Constitution

The Constitutional Convention takes place in Philadelphia and, by the account of many participants during the process, ends with a miracle of divine providence in the formation of the constitution that provided the American people with a people's government assuring their rights and freedom, with a balance of powers, and equal representation for all states. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-bmAqhMrX4 "Miracle at Philadelphia " is in fact a quote from a letter written by George Washington. James Madison also used it in writing to friends. In 1787 there is much tension and dissension between the States which started soon after the war of ...
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The Treaty of Paris of 1783, Negotiated Between the United States and Great Britain, Ended the Revolutionary War and Recognized American Independence

On 3 September 1783, the Peace of Paris was signed and the American War for Independence officially ended. The following excerpt from John Ferling’s Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War of Independence recounts the war’s final moments, when Washington bid farewell to his troops. The war was truly over. It had lasted well over eight years, 104 blood-drenched months to be exact. As is often the habit of wars, it had gone on far longer than its architects of either side had foreseen in 1775. More than 100,000 American men had borne arms in the Continental army ...
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Did Isaac Potts Really See Washington Pray at Valley Forge?

One of the legends or myths of Valley Forge is that Washington prayed for his country here. We do not say that he did not pray at Valley Forge (he assuredly did), there simply is an open question as to how he did so and if he actually was witnessed in prayer. Although this article has been added with a date of January 17, 1778, the actual day is unknown. There are a number of artists who represent Washington kneeling in prayer, some in the snow, some in the grass of a glade in the woods. There are even ...
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George Washington Inspires a Tired and Defeated Army to Continue the Fight for Liberty

George Washington faced a grim moment January 1, 1777. All enlistments for the Continental Army had expired on that date and all of the army, or at least what was left of it, was free to go home. This would not just cripple the Revolution, but probably end it. He gathered his troops together, the drum roll began, and the general asked all those willing to extend their tours to step forward. Not one soul moved. Then, as Tim Ballard tells it in his book The Washington Hypothesis, “A depressed Washington turned his horse and began riding away. Then ...
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Continental Congress Calls for a Day of Fasting and Humiliation for the Soldiers

Because of the distressing condition of the tattered but unbowed soldiers, the American Continental Congress called for a day of fasting and humiliation: Resolved, That it be recommended to all the United States, as soon as possible to appoint a day of solemn fasting and humiliation; to implore of Almighty God the forgiveness of the many sins prevailing among all ranks, and to beg the countenance and assistance of his Providence in the prosecution of the present just and necessary war. Shortly after the resolution on fasting, three important events occurred. On 13 December 1776, General Howe disclosed his decision to ...
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The Miracle at the Battle of Long Island

British General Howe had trapped Washington and his 8,000 troops on Brooklyn Heights on Long Island, and he intended to advance the next morning to destroy them. But Washington gathered every vessel he could find and spent all night ferrying his men across the East River, leaving fires burning at camp to satisfy the British that they were still at camp. In the morning there was still a large number of soldiers facing annihilation by Howe, but a heavy fog descended on the area enabling the rest of Washington's troops to escape the British trap. According to eyewitnesses, Gen. Washington ...
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George Washington Reminds his Troops that ‘the Fate of Unborn Millions Will Now Depend, Under God, on the Courage and Conduct of this Army’

George Washington, in another General Order, would remind his men that “the fate of unborn Millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army…Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is.” As Joan of Arc, the God fearing General Washington knew that the Lord would more quickly hear their prayers if they were exercising courage and displaying conduct that was deserving of the reward of the victory they not only sought, but knew was their destiny from a righteous cause ...
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George Washington Writes in a Letter to his Brother, “Providence Which Has in Many Instances Appear’d for Us, Will Still Go On to Afford Its Aid”

On May 31, 1776, George Washington wrote to his younger brother John Augustine Washington, We expect a very bloody Summer of it at New York. … We are not either in Men, or Arms, prepared for it. … If our cause is just, as I do most religiously believe it to be, the same Providence which has in many instances appear’d for us, will still go on to afford its aid. What sets "George Washington's Sacred Fire" apart from all previous works on this man for the ages, is the exhaustive fifteen years of Dr. Peter Lillback's research, revealing ...
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George Washington Orders his Troops to Observe the Day of Fasting, Humiliation, and Prayer for the ‘Giver of Victory to Prosper Our Arms’

The rag-tag and green Continental Army would need heaven’s help. In April 1776, they arrived in New York, a city with a large population of Loyalists and surrounded by water that was conducive to a British naval attack. By June the British fleet arrived in the harbor with some four hundred ships. It was at this time, the largest force ever sent forth by one nation to another. One of Washington’s men wrote, “I declare that I thought all London was afloat.” The Americans numbered well under half of the British troops, but they did have a promise of ...
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Battle of Dorchester: General Washington Bold Plan to Take Back Boston is Foiled by Weather, but Maybe God kept His Young Army from a Battle they Could Not Win

Gen. Washington's bold plan to take back Boston, would have trapped him on Dorchester Heights early in the war without an escape route in which had saved the patriots several times when they found they were outmatched by the well-trained British troops. But, a sudden, unexpected storm had saved Washington and his young army and had given him time to develop military strategies that would make the inexperienced American army more effective. Early in the war, the most effective strategy for the Americans was to fight, then retreat so that the inexperienced Continental Army would not engage the more ...
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The Miraculous Story of ‘The Bulletproof President’, George Washington

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebHXYUwX7HY The miraculous story of 'The Bulletproof President' once appeared in virtually every student text in America. At the Battle at the Monongahela, Washington and the British army were ambushed by the French. Every officer on horseback was killed except Washington. He later wrote to his brother John on July 18, 1755: But by the all-powerful dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me. The French ...
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Young America’s Miraculous Defeat of the French Fleet

On this day, a national fast was observed throughout America for the Lord to protect them as a fleet and armament to recover... Novascotia, and to lay waste the whole seacoast from Novascotia to Georgia. A large fleet of 70 ships neared the coast when Reverend Prince at the Old South Meeting House in Boston (as well as ministers throughout America) prayed for help. Historian Catherine Drinker Bowen relates that, "That very night God sent upon them a more dreadful storm than either of the former, and completed their destruction. Some overset, some foundered, and a remnant only of ...
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Italian Explorer Christopher Columbus Discovered the “New World” of the Americas on an Expedition ‘Led by Hand of God’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iQeuzP2guk On several occasions Columbus gave credit to the Almighty. In writing to the Spanish leaders, he said, “Our Lord unlocked my mind, sent me upon the sea, and gave me fire for the deed. Who heard of my enterprise, called it foolish, mocked me, and laughed. But who can doubt but that the Holy Ghost inspired me?” (Jacob Wassermann, Columbus, Don Quixote of the Seas, trans. Eric Sutton, Boston: Little, Brown, and Co., 1930, p. 20.) During the voyage, after weeks of sailing with no land in sight, mutiny raised its head. Finally Columbus promised the captains of the two ...
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